THE DOZENS: TWELVE SONNYS OF JAZZ by Scott Albin

Jazz Quiz: What do these names have in common?

Saul Berman
Herman Blount
Conrad Yeatis Clark
William Criss
Cornelius Fortune
Herbert Lawrence Greennidge
William Greer
Sylvester Kyner
Theodore Walter Rollins
Warren Harding Sharrock
Huey Simmons
Edward Stitt

Answer: They are all jazz musicians better known as “Sonny.” In the case of three, further elaboration is necessary. Herman “Sonny” Blount became Sun Ra, Herbert Lawrence Greennidge became Sonny Greenwich, and Sylvester Kyner became Sonny Red.



          Sonny Rollins (Photo by Ron Hudson)

When you first discover the wonderments of jazz and explore the works of its many diverse players, you happen upon one “Sonny” after another, and they achieve somewhat proprietary status in your mind—they are your Sonnys. A group of dedicated musicians, they have experienced careers of varying degrees of success; some met tragic, premature ends while others still perform to large audiences today. They represent a microcosm of life in general, but the jazz fan has a special affinity for these individual creative artists.

Yes, there have been Sonnys in other walks of public life: pop singer Sonny Bono, Japanese action film star Sonny Chiba, Georgia governor Sonny Perdue, New York Jets franchise owner Sonny Werblin, NFL Hall of Fame quarterback Sonny Jurgensen, and heavyweight boxer Sonny Liston. Perhaps even Sonny Corleone, Mario Puzo’s fictional character in his novel The Godfather, can be thought of as well. For the jazz fan, however, these are mere pretenders.

What follows is a tribute to 12 of the Sonnys of jazz, with apologies to a few in the fraternity who didn’t make the cut, so to speak, including trumpeter/bandleader Sonny Dunham, bassist Sonny Dallas, organist Sonny Phillips, drummer Sonny Payne, and trumpeter Sonny Cohn.


Woody Herman (featuring Sonny Berman): Your Father's Moustache

Track

Your Father's Moustache

Artist

Woody Herman (clarinet, vocals)

CD

The Thundering Herds, 1945-1947 (Columbia CK 44108)

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Musicians:

Woody Herman (clarinet, vocals), Sonny Berman (trumpet), Bill Harris (trombone), Flip Phillips (tenor sax), Red Norvo (vibes), Chubby Jackson (bass), Buddy Rich (drums),

Pete Candoli, Conte Candoli, Neal Hefti, Ray Linn (trumpets), Ralph Pfiffner, Ed Kiefer (trombones), Sam Marowitz, John La Porta (alto saxes), Pete Mondello, Flip Phillips (tenor saxes), Skippy De Sair (baritone sax), Tony Aless (piano), Billy Bauer (guitar)

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Composed by Bill Harris & Woody Herman; arranged by Neal Hefti

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Recorded: New York, September 5, 1945

Albumcoverwoodyherman-thunderingherds1945-1947

Rating: 94/100 (learn more)

"Your Father's Moustache" captures Herman's First Herd in full charge, and noticeably emerging out of the band's glorious brass section – to nearly steal the track – is the promising 21-year-old trumpeter Sonny Berman. After the simmering piano-bass-vibes intro, wailing bursts from the trumpets merge with Herman's bluesy clarinet phrases, and then Berman's blaring fills. Berman takes the first exuberant solo, and proves he is not simply a superficial high-note specialist, as he craftily switches keys midway. After a pungent statement from Bill Harris, and Flip Phillip's purring Prez-like expressions, Norvo's vibes close out the soloing alongside powerful exclamations from the brass. A contrasting interlude now transpires that moves from a "Seven Come Eleven" motif on to a train whistle/locomotive effect. Then silliness ensues, as the band's vocal chorus of "Ah, yer faddah's moustache," is bolstered by Berman's humorous muted squeals. The call-and-response between Chubby Jackson's crudely slapped bass and Buddy Rich's overwrought drums maintains the prevailing lighthearted mood to the very end.

Sonny Berman would die of a drug overdose in 1947, just after the First Herd was disbanded. Ironically, he had begun playing the trumpet only after an older brother, a talented trumpeter, died in a diving accident at age 17. Sonny wanted to have the career that his brother would not experience, but tragically it was never meant to be for either of them.

Reviewer: Scott Albin


Sun Ra: Enlightenment

Track

Enlightenment

Artist

Sun Ra (piano)

CD

Jazz in Silhouette (Evidence 22012)

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Musicians:

Sun Ra (piano),

Hobart Dotson (trumpet), Julian Priester (trombone), Marshall Allen, James Spaulding (alto saxes), John Gilmore (tenor sax), Pat Patrick, Charles Davis (baritone sax), Ronnie Boykins (bass), William Cochran (drums)

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Composed by Sun Ra & Hobart Dotson

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Recorded: Chicago, IL, 1958

Albumcoversunra-jazzinsilhouette

Rating: 95/100 (learn more)

The '70s Impulse vinyl reissues of Sun Ra's obscure Saturn recordings, and their later reappearance starting in the '90s from Evidence on CD, greatly bolstered Ra's musical credentials. Some looked upon him as a charlatan who used showmanship and smoke and mirrors to disguise what were perceived as the deficiencies of his Arkestra. However, as these recordings proved, inconsistency does not equal ineptitude. If Sun Ra's self-produced sessions had been released widely and regularly by major labels throughout his lifetime, the jazz history books might read differently, such was his all-encompassing ability to look both forward and into the past for inspiration, along what he would probably have referred to as the "space-time continuum."

Ra's 1958 band was one of his strongest assemblages, and the serene, exquisite "Enlightenment" is one of the best early Chicago-period tracks. Later, a rearranged version of this tune would become a sort of theme song for the Arkestra, with an added vocal chant to go along with all the mythology, costumes and dancing. In 1958, it simply smacks of Tadd Dameron both compositionally and in the instrumental voicings. The catchy vamps flow gracefully one into another, and it's difficult to get the entire piece out of your mind after several listens. Upon the sounding of a gong, Patrick plays the alluring theme backed by Ra's waltzing chords, Cochran's cymbal accents, and fluttering horn lines. Patrick moves into the distinctive bridge aided by additional counterlines before Dotson's fluid trumpet takes over the melody. A delightful Afro-Cuban segment is followed by Ra's sparse solo that lands somewhere between Ellington and Basie. The pulsating Latin motif is revisited prior to Dotson's subdued recital of the melody over seductive horn fillips. Dotson's final emphatic flurry caps a classic Ra performance.

Reviewer: Scott Albin


Sonny Clark: Sonny's Crib

Track

Sonny's Crib [aka Sonny's Crip]

Artist

Sonny Clark (piano)

CD

Sonny Clark Trio (Bainbridge 1044)

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Musicians:

Sonny Clark (piano), George Duvivier (bass), Max Roach (drums).

Composed by Sonny Clark

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Recorded: New York, March 23, 1960

Albumcoversonnyclarktrio

Rating: 93/100 (learn more)

One of Sonny Clark's best trio sessions was strangely not recorded by Blue Note, the label for which he was virtually the "house pianist" for the major part of his tragically shortened career. (He died in 1963 at the age of 31.) "Sonny's Crib," which was also the title track of Clark's 1957 album featuring John Coltrane, is an ebullient bop theme with a hint of Gigi Gryce's "Social Call" in its final bars. Except for some lively traded fours with Roach near the end, this version is dominated by Clark's extended solo, which shows an obvious Bud Powell influence in both its phrasing and rhythmic sense, and in the way he utilizes his left hand quite sparingly, although his touch differs somewhat from Powell's. While Clark's playing is unlike theirs, his sustained drive brings to mind the consistently reliable pianists Hampton Hawes and Wynton Kelly. He also sounds a lot like Barry Harris on this particular track – or was it Barry who was imitating him? In any case, this "Sonny's Crib" finds Clark cultivating his bebop roots, rather than the hard-bop style that emerged from them.

Reviewer: Scott Albin


Sonny Criss: Sunny

Track

Sunny

Artist

Sonny Criss (alto sax)

CD

Up, Up and Away (Original Jazz Classics 982-2)

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Musicians:

Sonny Criss (alto sax), Tal Farlow (guitar), Cedar Walton (piano), Bob Cranshaw (bass),

Lenny McBrowne (drums)

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Composed by Bobby Hebb

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Recorded: New York, August 18, 1967

Albumcoversonnycriss-upupandaway

Rating: 93/100 (learn more)

It was a shock to the many loyal fans of Sonny Criss when he took his own life at age 50 in 1977, just as he was about to begin his first tour of Japan. How could this uplifting, spirited altoist have committed such an act? It wasn't until years later in a 1988 Jazz Times article that Sonny's mother revealed that her son had been diagnosed with stomach cancer and could no longer deal with the pain. In the late '60s, Criss was using his soulful, luscious tone, polished technique, masterful sense of form, overflowing wealth of ideas, and a natural rhythmic flexibility, to record infectious versions of tunes of the day such as "Eleanor Rigby," "The Beat Goes On," "Ode to Billie Joe," "Misty Roses," "I'll Catch the Sun," "Up, Up and Away" and "Sunny."

Bobby Hebb wrote "Sunny" in a purging reaction to both JFK's assassination in 1963 and the coincidental murder of his brother the very next day. Ella Fitzgerald recorded it, as did Sinatra with Ellington, among the many covers of Hebb's own 1966 hit. Criss perfectly captures the earnest innocence of this love song's lyrics through his horn, yet without compromising his musical integrity. After Walton's perky intro, Criss drives headlong through the melody and right into his scorching solo, which contains exuberant, glittering runs and highly effective bluesy pitch alterations, and just keeps building in intensity. Walton's solo is not nearly as captivating, although he finishes with a flourish that pretty much salvages it. Criss restates the theme with the same vigor as before, fading his ending with a satisfying riff derived from a key phrase of the well-known tune. If you strain hard, you may barely hear guitarist Tal Farlow in the background. Either he didn't know the tune and elected to play sparingly, or he was woefully under-recorded.

Reviewer: Scott Albin


Sonny Fortune: Hornin' In

Track

Hornin' In

Artist

Sonny Fortune (alto sax)

CD

Trilogy Collection [originally Four in One] (Sound Reason)

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Musicians:

Sonny Fortune (alto sax), Kirk Lightsey (piano), Buster Williams (bass), Billy Hart (drums).

Composed by Thelonious Monk

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Recorded: Englewood Cliffs, NJ, January 17-18 & 27, 1994

Albumcoversonnyfortune-trilogycollection

Rating: 95/100 (learn more)

Sonny Fortune considered Four in One to be "my first traditionally oriented jazz album." Outside of several of Monk's best known tunes, Fortune was not really familiar with Monk's body of work until several years prior to this project. Like Coltrane before him, Fortune adapted his individual style to the unique logic and idiosyncrasies of Monk's compositions, and revealed – to listeners and perhaps even to himself – an aspect of his musical personality that was fresh and surprising.

In checking Monk's discography, it appears that "Hornin' In" was recorded by him just once, in 1952, with a sextet that included Kenny Dorham, Lou Donaldson, Lucky Thompson and Max Roach. Hart's resounding Roach-like intro jump-starts Fortune's and Lightsey's unison rendition of the carefree, skittering theme, with its typically distinctive and complementary bridge. At first in his extended alto solo, Fortune sounds and phrases like Charlie Rouse, but gradually Sonny's unmistakable rhythmic flair, zestful post-bop flourishes, and other original stylistic quirks make the piece his own as he commandingly negotiates the stimulating chord progressions. Note Hart's brilliant drum work throughout, as well as Lightsey's perfectly attuned Monk-centric comping. Williams, as usual, can hardly be heard, even with Rudy Van Gelder at the controls. This is a take-no-prisoners version of a relatively obscure Monk tune that deserves to be played more often.

Reviewer: Scott Albin


Sonny Greenwich: Libra Ascending

Track

Libra Ascending

Artist

Sonny Greenwich (guitar)

CD

Live at Sweet Basil (Justin Time 26-2)

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Musicians:

Sonny Greenwich (guitar),

Fred Henke (piano), Ron Seguin (bass), Andre White (drums)

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Composed by Sonny Greenwich

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Recorded: live at Sweet Basil, New York, September 2, 1987

Albumcoversonnygreenwich-liveatsweetbasil

Rating: 92/100 (learn more)

In the mid-to-late '60's, Sonny Greenwich played with Charles Lloyd, toured with John Handy, and after a week-long working audition in Toronto in 1969 was invited by Miles Davis to join his band. Due to Sonny's immigration difficulties, that opportunity was never realized, although he got to play with Miles again in Toronto in 1972. From that point to the present, Greenwich has been relatively reclusive, playing – and sporadically recording – in and around Montreal and Toronto in his native Canada, and very rarely making trips elsewhere.

One such trip was to New York in 1987 for a weekday matinee concert at the now-defunct Sweet Basil jazz club, as part of that year's Greenwich Village Jazz Festival. A few hip New Yorkers, including yours truly, took that afternoon off from work to hear the esteemed Canadian guitarist up close and personal. Greenwich has a style influenced by cubist artist Paul Klee, classical composers Ravel and Debussy, and most especially the spiritual modality of John Coltrane. Sonny's "Libra Ascending" is "dedicated to the memory of John Coltrane." The guitarist's gently subdued intro is an unusually brief one for him, as he suddenly surges into a driving extended passage with a ringing, metallic tone, urged on by White's flailing drums. A gratifying release transports Greenwich into his main improvisation, his urgent staccato phrasing gradually building to an almost uncomfortably impassioned peak. Henke's piano solo maintains the leader's forceful momentum, but is overwhelmed by White's unrelenting drum rolls and cymbal crashes. Greenwich is better able to match White's aggressiveness in the duo's rousing exchange of fours. If you ever wondered what Coltrane might have sounded like on guitar, Greenwich could be the answer.

Reviewer: Scott Albin


Duke Ellington (featuring Sonny Greer): Ko-Ko (live 1940)

Track

Ko-Ko

Artist

Duke Ellington (piano)

CD

Fargo, North Dakota, November 7, 1940 (Vintage Jazz Classics 1019/20-2)

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Musicians:

Duke Ellington (piano), Sonny Greer (drums), Jimmy Blanton (bass), Joe "Tricky Sam" Nanton (trombone),

Rex Stewart (cornet), Wallace Jones, Ray Nance (trumpets), Juan Tizol, Lawrence Brown (trombones), Barney Bigard (clarinet), Johnny Hodges (alto sax), Otto “Toby” Hardwick (clarinet, alto sax), Ben Webster (tenor sax), Harry Carney (baritone sax), Freddy Guy (guitar)

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Composed by Duke Ellington

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Recorded: live at The Crystal Ballroom, Fargo, ND, November 7, 1940

Albumcoverdukeellington-fargond-november7-1940

Rating: 97/100 (learn more)

While Sonny Greer was sometimes described as a casual or erratic timekeeper, he was also known as a subtle and discreet drummer who fit the Ellington orchestra perfectly, since the arrangements Duke's musicians played were all about voicings, coloration, textures and dynamics. When Greer sat amongst his elaborate configuration (except for one-night stands like this) of snare, tom-toms, bass drum, cymbals, timpani, vibes, chimes and gong, you might have thought he was the leader of the band, yet he was primarily there to supply a complementary rhythmic foundation, not to perform showy solos like a Gene Krupa or a Buddy Rich. Greer did this for Duke from 1927 to 1951.

The Fargo, ND, dance date recording of "Ko-Ko" is a very clear example of Greer's prowess, as well as his remarkable rapport with the great bass innovator Jimmy Blanton. The arrangement and execution may be lacking compared to the tune's classic original studio recording from earlier that year, but the performance is just as exciting, thanks in part to Blanton and Greer. This version of the blues piece is levitated initially by Greer's bass drum and Blanton's pulsating bass, the rhythms somewhat a throwback to Duke's old "jungle" style. The harmonically sophisticated intricacies of the call-and-response riffs and vamps between the saxes, trumpets and trombones, Nanton's charged plunger-muted solo, Blanton's provocative fills, and the powerful crescendo ending with its return of the jungle beat, all combine to make this a prime Ellington track.

Reviewer: Scott Albin


Donald Byrd (featuring Sonny Red): Fly Little Bird Fly

Track

Fly Little Bird Fly

Artist

Donald Byrd (trumpet)

CD

Mustang (Blue Note 8599632)

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Musicians:

Donald Byrd (trumpet), Sonny Red Kyner (alto sax), Hank Mobley (tenor sax), McCoy Tyner (piano),

Walter Booker (bass), Freddie Waits (drums)

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Composed by Donald Byrd

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Recorded: Englewood Cliffs, NJ, June 24, 1966

Albumcoverdonaldbyrd-mustang

Rating: 90/100 (learn more)

Sylvester Kyner was his real name, but he was better known as Sonny Red. Despite several recordings as a leader and further recording and performing as a sideman in the '50's and '60's, the altoist never really made his mark. Red appeared on four mid-'60s Donald Byrd sessions for Blue Note, beginning with Mustang. The title tune was Red's, which the composer hoped might become a big hit like "The Sidewinder" so he could buy a new car. This didn't happen. "Fly Little Bird Fly" got just as much airplay back in the day, and deserved it – a stirring Byrd composition with complex changes based on a whole- tone scale. Pianist Tyner, used to such harmonies from playing with Coltrane, is riveting in his absolute onslaught of a solo, which leaves no stone unturned, as well as in his fleet-fingered intro. Red, exhibiting his clear Jackie McLean influence, sounds less comfortable, as he sticks closely to the melody in his solo and plays mostly choppy, truncated phrases. The spirit is there, but not the inspiration. Byrd and Mobley open up a bit more in their improvisations, but only Tyner truly breaks through the pre-imposed structure, aided in no small part by his darting left-hand punctuations.

Reviewer: Scott Albin


Sonny Rollins: Sonnymoon for Two

Track

Sonnymoon for Two

Artist

Sonny Rollins (tenor sax)

CD

A Night at the Village Vanguard (Blue Note 99795)

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Musicians:

Sonny Rollins (tenor sax), Wilbur Ware (bass), Elvin Jones (drums).

Composed by Sonny Rollins

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Recorded: live at the Village Vanguard, New York, November 3, 1957

Albumcoversonnyrollinsvangaurdone

Rating: 98/100 (learn more)

This was the first live recording ever at the fabled Village Vanguard, and although about 100 have been made there since, none tops what Sonny Rollins achieved on November 3, 1957. In a pared-down trio format, Rollins performs with a profound combination of spontaneity, discipline and wit. Not only that, but Rudy Van Gelder's original onsite engineering, not to mention his superb remastering for the 1999 RVG edition, captures the ambiance and immediacy of a live jazz club performance – and specifically the aura of the Village Vanguard, whether or not you've ever been there – as well as or better than any comparable recording.

Rollins's successful Way Out West recording date earlier that year, with just Ray Brown and Shelly Manne, perhaps inspired him to try the pianoless trio concept at the Vanguard. On "Sonnymoon for Two," his riffing blues piece, Rollins's extended 5-minute solo is essentially a series of clever thematic variations, interspersed with fleet boppish runs that contrast nicely with his various inventive blues licks. All this is played with an almost sardonically dry tenor tone that adds a distinctly modern sound to this unassuming blues. The density and complexity of Rollins's phrasing increases gradually, but he repeatedly references the main theme. When he hits upon an entirely new riff near the end, he develops it too in concise yet vivid fashion before entering a series of crisp exchanges with first Ware and then Jones, the drummer displaying facets of the style that would later coalesce during his years with John Coltrane.

Reviewer: Scott Albin


Sonny Sharrock: Venus / Upper Egypt

Track

Venus / Upper Egypt

Artist

Sonny Sharrock (guitar)

CD

Highlife (Enemy 119-2)

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Musicians:

Sonny Sharrock (guitar),

Dave Snider (Korg M1, Korg Wave Station), Charles Baldwin (bass), Abe Speller, Lance Carter (drums)

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Composed by Pharoah Sanders

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Recorded: Jersey City, NJ, October 1990

Albumcoversonnysharrock-highlife

Rating: 95/100 (learn more)

Sonny Sharrock was one of the early avant-garde guitarists, along with the likes of Derek Bailey, Eugene Chadbourne and James "Blood" Ulmer. He and Ulmer both achieved some commercial success, but Sonny died of a heart attack in 1994 at perhaps the height of his popularity up to that time. Sharrock's playing was often fierce and violent in nature, as with the group Last Exit, and yet there was a lyrical side to him as well, which surfaced on such later recordings as Highlife.

It was fitting that Sharrock would record Pharoah Sanders's "Venus" and "Upper Egypt" (here as one continuous track), since during his two years with Sanders in the '60's he performed on the saxophonist's Tauhid album, which included these compositions. Snider's keyboards introduce "Venus" with a Far Eastern flavor, spiced up by the drummers' bustling cymbal accents. Sonny then enters with a rich, inviting tone to play the spiritual, affirmative theme, actually sounding much like another Sonny, the Canadian guitarist Sonny Greenwich. After a slight pause, the group segues into "Upper Egypt," which Sharrock also plays with a glowing, piercing tone. His improvisation approaches his more familiar sheets of sound, but steers clear of sonic chaos. Snider's solo keeps the peace as well, melodic and featuring pleasing angular runs. Sharrock returns for his most intense feedback-laden passages, but this track (and session) is a far cry from anything cutting edge. This is the other, more polished side of Sonny Sharrock – equally valid and well worth hearing.

Reviewer: Scott Albin


Sonny Simmons: The Other East

Track

The Other East

Artist

Sonny Simmons (alto sax)

CD

Ancient Ritual (Qwest 9-45623-2)

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Musicians:

Sonny Simmons (alto sax),

Charnett Moffett (bass), Zarak Simmons (drums)

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Composed by Sonny Simmons

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Recorded: San Francisco, CA, December 7-8, 1992

Albumcoversonnysimmons-ancientritual

Rating: 96/100 (learn more)

Sonny Simmons had wanted this CD to be called Reincarnation, which would have been apt considering that he had spent a good part of the previous 15 years as a street musician in San Francisco, sometimes using the alias "Black Jack Pleasanton" to avoid recognition. Simmons was one of the earliest free jazz players, recording in the '60's with Eric Dolphy, Prince Lasha, Elvin Jones, and his then-wife, trumpeter Barbara Donald, before virtually disappearing from the scene by the mid-'70s. Yet given the undiminished vitality and adventurousness of his playing, this major-label comeback released in 1994 put him back on the map.

Simmons was joined for this session by bassist Charnett Moffett, the son of old friend and drummer Charles Moffett, and by his own son Zarak on drums. "The Other East" starts out with Simmons playing a rotating cycle of riffs and/or vamps, the first one bluesy, followed by others with the pronounced flavor of Indian classical music. Simmons then explodes, his fluid, cogent lines breathlessly insistent. His lucid phrasing and timbre most often resemble those of Ornette Coleman, although he periodically unleashes a dissonant cry that is more remindful of Dolphy. His overall concept, however, possesses a fully formed individuality. While regrettably the under-recorded Moffett can barely be heard, Zarak's drumming is persistently encouraging and responsive. His solo shows both an energetic technical mastery and a refined sense of coloration and texture, with particularly skillful use of the bass drum.

Reviewer: Scott Albin


Sonny Stitt: I Got Rhythm

Track

I Got Rhythm

Artist

Sonny Stitt (alto and tenor saxes)

CD

Endgame Brilliance: Constellation and Tune Up! (32 JAZZ 2009292)

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Musicians:

Sonny Stitt (alto and tenor saxes), Barry Harris (piano), Sam Jones (bass),

Alan Dawson (drums)

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Composed by George & Ira Gershwin

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Recorded: New York, February 8, 1972

Albumcoversonnystitt-endgamebrilliance-constellationandtuneup

Rating: 98/100 (learn more)

The two albums that Sonny Stitt recorded in 1972 for respected producer Don Schlitten's Cobblestone label were among the finest of the 150 or so sessions that Stitt led during his prolific career. Coming off a very successful international tour with the Giants of Jazz, a group that included Dizzy, Monk and Art Blakey, Stitt was in top form. Add a highly compatible rhythm section and a no-gimmick concept, and you were almost assured of hearing Stitt at full throttle, rather than on autopilot as was too often the case when he entered the studio.

What makes this over 9-minute version of "I Got Rhythm," originally from the Tune Up! release, so memorable is that it showcases at length Stitt's equally formidable proficiency on both alto and tenor. Stitt commences on tenor in a bluesy loping fashion, sounding almost like a big band sax section all by himself, before going up tempo with a clarion call. His swift, fresh extended lines, rhythmically varied attack, and artful resolutions continue throughout this exhilarating, romping improvisation that defies all expectations, in that it jumps from peak to yet higher peak. You may find yourself sitting there shaking your head from side to side in disbelief, while tapping your foot uncontrollably. Harris, Jones and Dawson are in rousingly tight formation behind him all the way, and Harris delivers an inspired, eloquent bop proclamation of his own before Stitt returns on alto for a second, shorter solo. Again, Stitt's dexterity and imagination are in perfect sync, with nary a wasted note. Stitt moves back to tenor for the winding down, a testifying, soulful ending to a masterpiece.

Reviewer: Scott Albin


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