Gerry Mulligan: All the Things You Are (1957)

Track

All the Things You Are (1957)

Artist

Gerry Mulligan (baritone sax)

CD

Mullenium (Columbia/Legacy CK 65678)

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Musicians:

Gerry Mulligan (baritone sax), Lee Konitz (alto sax), Don Joseph (trumpet),

Phil Sunkel, Jerry Lloyd, Don Ferrara (trumpets), Bob Brookmeyer, Frank Rehak, Jim Dahl (trombones), Hal McKusick (alto sax), Zoot Sims, Charlie Rouse (tenor saxes), Gene Allen (baritone sax), Joe Benjamin (bass), Dave Bailey (drums)

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Composed by Oscar Hammerstein II & Jerome Kern. Arranged by Gerry Mulligan

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Recorded: New York, April 20, 1957

Albumcovergerrymulligan-mullenium

Rating: 93/100 (learn more)

This recording was part of a project that "might have been." Columbia Records producer George Avakian asked Mulligan to record an album with a big band. Mulligan wrote a few scores and recorded them over two days with an all-star group. He wasn't entirely happy with the results, later saying that the rhythm section didn't have the looseness he'd achieved with his small groups. However, he cited "All the Things You Are" as one of the recordings he was particularly pleased with. An earlier version of this arrangement was written for the Stan Kenton Orchestra; along with the original pieces Mulligan submitted to Stanley during this period, he was assigned arrangements for dancing, which he considered "dog work." Obviously there was enough interest in this setting to cause him to revisit it. Beginning with an introduction in 3/4 time, Mulligan plays the melody. He is joined in the next chorus by a contrapuntal dialogue between himself, Lee Konitz and trumpeter Don Joseph. The orchestral statement that follows is similar to the Kenton version, and the arrangement features a lovely out-chorus with the 3/4 intro returning.

Avakian shelved the tapes on Mulligan's request, and the project officially died when Avakian left Columbia. Gerry would remember the lessons he'd learned from this abortive project when he formed his Concert Jazz Band, which did have the looseness of a small group.

Reviewer: Jeff Sultanof

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