Sarah DeLeo: Stolen Moments

"Stolen Moments" is the jazziest number on vocalist Sarah DeLeo's I'm In Heaven Tonight. The familiar strains of this Oliver Nelson standard are put across quite effectively by a first-class band. Say, why does that organist sound so familiar? Why, it's Brian Charette, whom I recently reviewed favorably right here on jazz.com!

In approach, if not in tone, DeLeo approaches this cut as Peggy Lee might have. It turns out that Peter Richmond, who wrote the book on Peggy Lee, is a fan of DeLeo and penned the liner notes for this album. So the connection is clear. The arrangement calls for Ms. DeLeo to sing a little faster and higher-pitched than the very cool Miss Lee. But it is Peggy she evokes, at least on this number. (Elsewhere on this album, in her rendition of "In the Cold, Cold Night," DeLeo may actually be channeling Lee.) As the liner notes suggest, this is music presented by a very talented song stylist you may expect to hear at an upscale establishment. If you can't afford that night out, there's always this CD to transport you.

January 22, 2009 · 0 comments

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Oliver Nelson: Stolen Moments

Based on a C-minor blues, this quintessential jazz standard embodies the finest elements of the lexicon, with Oliver Nelson’s evocative and haunting melody providing a perfect vehicle for the artistry of a truly stellar cast. Freddie Hubbard’s unusually soulful leadoff solo is followed by wonderfully aerodynamic flute flights from the inimitable Eric Dolphy. Nelson’s own delicately probing solo is perhaps one of jazz’s most eloquently understated tenor saxophone performances. Finally, Bill Evans's harmonically wistful piano turn serves as a beautifully thoughtful closing statement. All the while Paul Chambers's walking bass and Roy Haynes's steady, subtle snare work anchor this modern masterpiece, which Nelson himself considered the realization of his own true voice. We agree, and a timeless voice at that.

April 11, 2008 · 0 comments

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Oliver Nelson: Stolen Moments

This was my introduction to Freddie Hubbard as a young teenager. I was listening to WHAT-FM the jazz station in Philly, and I was in my father’s room—I remember that exact point in time in my life clearly because of his performance. From the very first declarative phrase of this classic solo he had a style all his own, not only an instantly recognizable sound and vibrato, but also the angularity of his solo, the way he used dynamics in it and laid back in the time caught my ear immediately. I could tell he listened to saxophonists, and when he ran up and down that Dmin7 chord I was simply amazed.

April 11, 2008 · 0 comments

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